Daytrips-Hull-The Return-Part 3. Home.

After a mixed sleep of dreaming that my retainer had turned itself into lots of loose false teeth we made our way to our personal Lenny’s breakfast sit down service. We kept it simple with our inclusive extras such as beans for Sarah’s safety net food choice and Black Pudding for myself as I like it dipped in my egg. 

We bid farewell to Lenny’s and made our way heavily with bags through the town towards the station. Most of the weight coming from breakfast pastries and mini tubs of Marmite.

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A small detour out of the cold brought us to a lovely arcade that showed us wondrous things such as this;

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Great joys…

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Outside we saw more beautiful things…

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The beautiful thing looking at times had to cease for an hour as we discovered Boyes and its many hidden worlds and wonders.

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I would like my own wig shop one day.

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Moving swiftly on we came across an unusual brick based hole. On further inspection we learned it was the remains of the Beverley Gate which is the spot where King Charles I was refused entry to Hull in 1642. Go HERE to see more.

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We took a fringe combing break before we ventured over to the Maritime Museum. The Enduring Eye exhibition was very good and I felt tearful seeing and reading the real life accounts of Shackleton’s men. That or I was having a lack of pastry pocket snacks withdrawal.

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Go HERE to read more about the exhibition on the Royal Geographical Society website. HERE to see a piece from Hull Museums Partnership. HERE to learn more about Ernest Shackleton and HERE to learn more about Frank Hurley.

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Here at this point in our cross town expedition, I purchased 10 cheese straws, two cheese and onion pasties and four pink ice finger buns. Further down the road was another Cooplands and in there I bought a pork pie and maybe some more cheese straws. I very much liked these golden tiles.

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At this point weariness and uncertainty had started to set in. We had achieved all objectives and had started to have empty nest syndrome as it was nearly home time. On the station wall were lots of mosaic birds all made by community groups in Hull called Fly to Freedom. On the windows of the station was an installation made by Claire Barber called The Train Track and the Basket. Look HERE to see more.

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The time was nearly upon us to depart and after 8 more cheese straws eaten in anxiety we split up and took ourselves off around the station to have a nose.

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Goodbye Hull :(

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I watched a programme last year called Handmade in Hull. Here is a programme extract from the BBC Four website;

‘A visually stunning tribute to Hull's craft traditions, produced in collaboration with artist Linda Brothwell as part of Hull City of Culture 2017. The film profiles the artisans whose skills put Hull on the map in Britain's industrial heyday, from the compass-maker whose precision-crafted instruments helped steer Hull's fishing fleet to boat builders and woodcarvers, all reflecting on the joys of their craft and its role in the city's past. A heartfelt and evocative portrait of Hull's great industrial heritage and the people who helped create it.’

All of the above is true and one part I remember was one of the makers saying that ‘Hull gets under your skin’ and they are right it does.